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November 1, 2021Blog Posts

Squid Game Cryptocurrency Scammers Make Off With $3.3 Million

Gizmodo

The anonymous hucksters behind a Squid Game cryptocurrency have officially pulled the rug on the project, making off with an estimated $3.38 million. Remember on Friday morning when Gizmodo told you it was an obvious scam? It was only obvious because investors could purchase the crypto but couldn’t sell it. But plenty of people didn’t get the warning in time.

The SQUID cryptocurrency peaked at a price of $2,861 before plummeting to $0 around 5:40 a.m. ET., according to the website CoinMarketCap. This kind of theft, commonly called a “rug pull” by crypto investors, happens when the creators of the crypto quickly cash out their coins for real money, draining the liquidity pool from the exchange.

The SQUID crypto coin was launched just last week and included plenty of red flags, including a three-week old website filled with bizarre spelling and grammatical errors. The website, hosted at SquidGame.cash, has disappeared, along with every other social media presence set up by the scammers. You can see an archived version of the website here.

Other red flags included the fact that SQUID’s Telegram channel, set up by the unknown scammers, didn’t allow comments from outsiders. And the Twitter account made it impossible for anyone to reply to posts.

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Crypto. The buzzword you hear everywhere from the news to friends hyping it up. Has the craze gone mainstream and reached businesses?

Big names like Microsoft, AMC, Starbucks, and AT&T are in, but what do small businesses think? The Strawhecker Group (TSG) used new survey data from nearly 600 small businesses in the U.S. to illustrate their knowledge, attitudes, and acceptance of cryptocurrency.

Download the infographic
Payments professionals across the ecosystem will find this infographic to be a great resource as the market continues to evolve. Are you working with merchants on a crypto strategy?

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